Business Administration Courses

Business Administration Courses

(GP) indicates that the course fulfills the Global Perspective Elective requirement in the General Education core.

BUS 2000 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS (1 s.h.)

An overview of American and international business with emphasis on formation and management origins. The course is a survey of the functional relationship of operations, marketing, finance, and human resource development. Business writing skills are emphasized. Course is offered as needed.

BUS 2160 STATISTICS FOR BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (3 s.h.)

Inferential statistics using business and economics data. Principal topics: probability, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation, and time series and forecasting. Prerequisite: MAT 1050 or permission of the department chair/school dean. This course is offered every fall and spring.

BUS 2250 MICROCOMPUTER BUSINESS APPLICATIONS (3 s.h.)

This course covers the utilization of microcomputers to solve problems in business. Topics to be covered include intermediate application of word processing, spreadsheet analysis and development, database management and report creation, and presentation software application. The course includes student completion of independent projects. This course is offered as
needed. Prerequisite: Major within the Reeves School of Business or permission of the department chair/school dean. Students may substitute CSC1000 for BUS 2250.

BUS 3000 PERSONAL FINANCE (3 s.h.)

An introduction to the personal financial planning process designed to equip students with the skills needed to manage their personal financial resources. Topics include cash management, goal setting, tax planning, risk management, investment planning, retirement planning, and estate planning. No prerequisites required. This course is offered as needed.

BUS 3010 ENTREPRENEURSHIP (3 s.h.)

This course covers the structuring process from conception to birth of a new venture. It concentrates on the attributes of successful endeavors, opportunity recognition, venture screening, innovation and creativity, identification of resources, and feasibility analysis to learn how to turn opportunities into viable businesses. Also included are business plans, financial start-up decisions, operating problem recognition, and problem solving. Prerequisite: junior or senior status or permission of the department chair/school dean. This course is offered as needed. Cross-listed as ECO 3010 and ENP 3010.

BUS 3100 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3 s.h.)

A survey of management information systems providing students with an understanding of what they are, how they affect the organization, how they can make businesses more competitive, and how they assist in decision-making. This course is offered as needed.

BUS 3150 BUSINESS AND SOCIETY (3 s.h.)

Using a managerial framework this course is a study of the relationship between business and economic policy, social responsibility, and political influence on a global level. As an intensive writing course it uses case studies to study business ethics and corporate responsibility while recognizing management’s traditional obligations to shareholders. The course spotlights current examples of business ethical issues which are relevant for stakeholders, corporate governance, accounting, and regulation of business. Prerequisites: ACC 2510, 2530; ECO 2610, 2620; or permission of the department chair/school dean.This course is offered every fall and spring semester.

BUS 3200 BUSINESS ETHICS (3 s.h.)

After a brief consideration of ethical theory, this course will examine selected ethical issues which arise from business, such as corporate responsibility, whistle blowing, environmental issues, and privacy. Particular emphasis will be placed on the role of the virtues in business practice. This course is offered in the spring semester, odd-numbered years. Cross listed as PHI 3200.

BUS 3310 FUNDAMENTALS IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (3 s.h.)

(GP) A thorough examination of the business opportunities and threats for individuals, companies, and countries created by the growth of globalization, and how companies must operate in diverse foreign environments and engage in specialized transactions. This course presents the theories and concepts of international business and considers the leading role of culture in global commerce. Prerequisite: completion of 12 semester hours or permission of the department chair/school dean.

BUS 3320 MANAGERIAL FINANCE (3 s.h.)

Management of funds from the corporate perspective, with emphasis on security valuation, risk analysis, financial forecasting, capital budgeting, capital structure components and their costs, and dividend policy. Prerequisites: ACC 2530, ECO 2160, and ECO 2620, or permission of the department chair/school dean. This course is offered every fall and spring semester.

BUS 3330 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS EXPERIENCE (3 s.h.)

(GP) An exploration of globalization and the cultural, economic, political, and legal environments of international business including an overview of risks, challenges, and opportunities of competing in the global marketplace. This course requires travel and research on the ground in another country (Study Abroad Course). Prerequisite: Permission of the department chair/school dean.

BUS 3360 DOMESTIC BUSINESS EXPERIENCE (3 s.h.)

An American business is a dynamic process that brings together people, consumers, technology, natural resources and human initiative in a constantly changing and competitive environment. To understand the framework in which a business operates, students will travel for an exploration and learning opportunity from the business. This course will require research and class time at an off-site location as selected by the professor of record. An additional fee will apply to cover the costs of travel and lodging. Travel for student conferences and conventions is prohibited as part of this course. Permission of the department chair/school dean.

 

BUS 3430 MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATION (3 s.h.)

Survey of the management functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling within both structural and behavioral contexts. Emphasis is given to individual behavior, interpersonal relationships, small groups, inter-group relations, leadership, and change within the various structures of contemporary formal organizations. Also, involves the study of organizational structure including the design of centralization, formalization, and complexity. Student teams are used to study course content through case studies and to experience the dynamics of team membership. This course is offered every fall and spring semester.

BUS 3450 INTERNSHIP I (3 s.h.)

Experiential learning acquired through placement with local organizations in either the private or public sectors. The student is assigned duties and responsibilities approved by the Director of Internships and supervised and evaluated by the University instructor and onsite trainer. Weekly class contact, journal or written reports are required. Classroom instruction includes resume/letter writing, interviewing techniques, and oral presentations. Prerequisites: BUS 3430 and MKT 2510, junior or senior status, and a minimum GPA of 2.5 in the major; or permission of the department chair/school dean . See MKT 3450 and ACC 4160. Applicable to one program only: Accounting, Business, Financial Economics, or Marketing. This course is offered in the spring semester or as needed.

BUS 3460 ENACTUS I (2 s.h.)

A special course under the auspices of ENACTUS. It involves the formation of project groups, training, and project design and is taken during the first semester of ENACTUS participation. Prerequisites: completion of 12 s.h or permission of the department chair/school dean. This course is offered every semester.

BUS 3470 ENACTUS II (2 s.h.)

Focuses on the communication of the principles of free enterprise and economic supply and demand to a diversity of publics through special projects. Continuation of BUS 3460 taken during the second semester of ENACTUS participation. Student-designed projects are entered into regional/national competitions. Prerequisite: BUS 3460 or permission of the department chair/school dean. This course is offered every semester.

BUS 3520 BUSINESS LAW I (3 s.h.)

The organization and theory of the American legal system and its relationship with the business environment, including contracts, tort law, and parts of the Uniform Commercial Code and its provisions concerning sales, the law of agency, and employment law. This course is offered every fall and spring semester. Prerequisites: ENG 1020 or permission of the department chair/school dean.

BUS 3530 BUSINESS LAW II (3 s.h.)

The Uniform Partnership Act, relevant corporate law, government regulation negotiable instruments, commercial paper, parts of the Uniform Commercial Code, banking and securities law, the law of secured transactions, and labor law . Prerequisite: BUS 3520 or permission of the department chair/school dean. This course is offered in the spring semester, odd numbered years.

BUS 3540 SPORTS LAW (3 s.h.)

A study of the law as it applies to professional and amateur sport organizations and participants. Analysis of contract law, tort law, constitutional law, administrative law, antitrust law, collective bargaining, and arbitration as it relates to sport. Introduction to the case method of problem solving techniques. Class presentations on current legal issues are required. Prerequisite: BUS 3520 or permission of the department chair/school dean. This course is offered in the fall semester, odd-numbered years.

BUS 3600 PRINCIPLES OF REAL ESTATE (3 s.h.)

A survey of legal, economic, and accounting principles applied to real property resources. Topics include brokerage, contracts, closings, valuation, investing, and finance. The analysis of income-producing property is emphasized. Prerequisites: BUS 3320 or permission of the department chair/school dean. This course is offered as needed.

BUS 3650 PRINCIPLES OF INSURANCE (3 s.h.)

An overview of the insurance industry and underwriting principles. Risk management, contract provisions, and contract law as applied to both casualty and life dimensions. Emphasis on the investment function of life insurance. This course is offered as needed.

BUS 3750 HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (3 s.h.)

Traditional functions of personnel administration: recruitment, selection, development, compensation, personnel planning, employee morale and the impact of legislation upon the personnel process. Prerequisite: BUS 3430 or permission of the department chair/school dean. This course is offered in the fall semester.

BUS 3760 COMPENSATION AND BENEFITS (3 s.h.)

This course is a focus on the study of the relationship between employees, employers, and the intervening factor of compensation and benefits. Compensation and Benefits draws upon the management functions of planning, organizing, leading and controlling within both structural and behavior contexts. Emphasis is given to the role managers within a broader society of laws, interpersonal relationships, inter-group relations and leadership. Student groups (teams) are created and used throughout the course to study the course content and produce a final project. Cross listed as LAW 3760.

BUS 3770 EMPLOYMENT LAW (3 s.h.)

An overview of Employment Law in the work place. A study of case law, regulations, and statutes on such issues as Title VII and Civil Rights Act. The Americans with Disabilities Act, Age Discrimination, National Origin Discrimination and other areas of Employment Law. Students will also be taught various issues of Employment law such as interviewing and job performance evaluations. Cross listed as LAW 3770.

BUS 3780 LABOR RELATIONS LAW (3 s.h.)

This course is a focus of the legal relationship between corporations and collective bargaining agents. It involves unionization, maintaining union free status, and de-unionization. Labor law draws upon the management functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling within both structural and behavior contexts. Emphasis is given to the role of managers within a broader society of laws, interpersonal relationships, inter-group relations, and leadership. Student groups (teams) are created and used throughout the course to study the course content through case studies and experience the dynamics of actually resolving cases. Cross Listed as LAW 3780.

BUS 3910 NEGOTIATION (3 s.h.)

This course is a focus study of the management topic of negotiation. Negotiation draws upon the management functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling within both structural and behavioral contexts. Emphasis is given to individual behavior, interpersonal relationships, small groups, inter-group relations, and leadership. Student groups (teams) are created and used throughout the course to study the course content through case studies and to experience the dynamics of actually negotiating. Cross listed as LAW 3910.

BUS 4100 REAL ESTATE LAW (3 s.h.)

An advanced study of real property ownership and interest, real property title transfer, real estate contracts, and federal income taxation of real property. Also included are landlord and tenant law, real estate brokerage law, and other topics required by the North Carolina Real Estate Commission. Prerequisite: BUS 3600 or permission of the department chair/school dean. This course is offered as needed.

BUS 4120 INTERMEDIATE MANAGERIAL FINANCE (3 s.h.)

Additional financial management concepts and practices; extensive case analysis with focus on the capital asset pricing model. Prerequisite: BUS 3320 or permission of the department chair/school dean. This course is offered every spring semester odd years.

BUS 4140 REAL ESTATE FINANCE (3 s.h.)

A survey of instruments, methods, institutions, and markets involved in the financing of real estate. Emphasis on primary and secondary markets, investment returns and risks, and construction and permanent financing. Prerequisite: BUS 3320 and 3600 or permission of the department chair/school dean. This course is offered as needed.

BUS 4150 INVESTMENT AND PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT (3 s.h.)

A survey of investment alternatives with emphasis on security evaluation, features of trading, the regulatory structure, and the design of portfolios. Prerequisite: BUS 3320 or permission of the department chair/school dean. This course is offered as needed.

BUS 4160 INTERNSHIP II (3 s.h.)

For students who have had BUS 3450 and would like to take another internship experience. See ENG 4160 or WRI 4160. This course is offered spring semester.

BUS 4200 REAL ESTATE BROKERAGE (3 s.h.)

A survey of various functions of the real estate brokerage business. Emphasis is placed upon the process of establishing the firm, management practices, financing, accounting systems (including trust account records and procedures, personnel policies, and marketing). Prerequisite: BUS 3600 or permission of the department chair/school dean. This course is offered as needed.

BUS 4260 ADVANCED MICROCOMPUTER BUSINESS APPLICATIONS (3 s.h.)

Advanced study of microcomputer applications with emphasis on business problem-solving skills. More sophisticated techniques in spreadsheet analysis and database management are included. Prerequisite: BUS 2250 or permission of the department chair/school dean . Offered as needed.

BUS 4370 FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS AND MARKETS (3 s.h.)

A survey of the major financial intermediaries with emphasis upon balance sheet account management, the principal securities traded, and the markets in which the trading occurs. Prerequisites: ACC 2510, ACC 2530, ECO 2610, and ECO 2620 or permission of the department chair/school dean. This course as needed.

BUS 4460 ENACTUS III (2 s.h.)

A special course under the auspices of ENACTUS. It involves the formation of project groups, training, and project design. Taken during the third semester of ENACTUS participation. Prerequisites: BUS 3460 and BUS 3470 or permission of the department chair/school dean. This course is offered every semester.

BUS 4470 ENACTUS IV (2 s.h.)

Focus on the communication of the principles of free enterprise and economic supply and demand to a diversity of publics through special projects. Student-designed projects are entered into regional/national competitions. Continuation of Business 4460 and taken during the fourth semester of ENACTUS participation. Prerequisites: BUS 3460, BUS 3470, and BUS 4460 or permission of the department chair/school dean. This course is offered every semester.

BUS 4500 MANAGEMENT SCIENCE (3 s.h.)

A survey of quantitative methods used in managerial decision making. Topics include linear programming, decision theory, project management models, inventory models, queuing theory, simulation, and forecasting. Use of computer software to solve problems. Prerequisites: ECO 2160, BUS 2250 or CSC 1000, and BUS 3430 or permission of the department chair/school dean . This course is offered every spring and fall semester.

BUS 4600 REAL ESTATE PRACTICUM (3 s.h.)

Experiential learning acquired through placement with a local real estate organization. The student is assigned duties and responsibilities approved by the Director of Real Estate and supervised and evaluated by the University instructor and on-site trainer. Weekly class contact, journal or written reports are required. Prerequisites: successful completion of two upper level real estate courses in addition to BUS 3600 or permission of the department chair/school dean. This course is offered as needed.

BUS 4650 NEW VENTURE CAPITAL (3 s.h.)

Business creation and innovation is explored through case analysis. This is applied to student ideas for a new business. A business plan is created. Venture financing models are considered to support the creation of the business. Entry and exit strategies are considered, such as franchising, acquisitions, sale, merger and liquidation. The course provides an understanding of the mindset, behaviors, experiences and skills of an entrepreneur. Key components to coursework include, learning how to evaluate and value new ventures, how to anticipate problems and develop pragmatic solutions, and assembling the resources to implement a strategic vision. Finally, students will present their plan to a panel of executives and faculty from the Reeves School of Business and its Center for Entrepreneurship. Prerequisites: ACC 2510, BUS 3010, 3430; or permission of the department chair/school dean. Cross-listed as ENP 4650.

BUS 4700 BUSINESS POLICY AND STRATEGY (3 s.h.)

A capstone course conducted with case method. Examination of external and internal environments of business. Analysis of the formulation and implementation of organizational strategy, both in private and not-for-profit sectors. Integration of prior studies in accounting, economics, management, marketing, law, and behavior. This course includes administration of a major field test in business as the required exit exam for all seniors in the Reeves School of Business. Prerequisites: BUS 3150, 3320, 3430, or ACC 3410 and BUS 3520, and MKT 2510 or permission of the department chair/school dean. This course is offered every fall and spring semester.

BUS 4800 BUSINESS SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT (3 s.h.)

A systematic approach to the study of business organizations and the establishment of criteria for computer-based information systems for management planning and control in various types of business environments. This course is designed to provide an understanding of the system development and modification process and to enable students to evaluate and choose a system development methodology. It emphasizes the factors for effective communication with users and team members and all those associated with development and maintenance of the system. This course is offered as needed.

BUS 4850 SPECIAL TOPICS (3 s.h.)

A topic in business not covered in depth in any of the other established courses in business. This course is offered as needed.

BUS 4990 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (TBA)

An opportunity for a well-qualified, upper-division student to engage in special research in his/her major. Requires approval by the faculty advisor, the supervising professor, the department chair, and the school dean before approval by the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Credit to be determined.

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