Engineering Courses

Engineering Courses

Engineering (EGR) Courses

EGR 1100 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING I (3 s.h.)

A glimpse into engineering and solving engineering problems. The student will learn fundamental tools including the engineering design process, measurements, hand graphics, and computer programming. The student will also gain an understanding of the engineering field, curriculum requirements, potential careers, teamwork, and project management. The course is hands-on and project-based requiring multiple small applied assignments and a larger semester team project. Two hours of lecture and two-and-one-half hours of design laboratory each week. Corequisite: MAT 1130. Offered: every fall semester.

EGR 1200 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING II (3 s.h.)

A continuation of EGR 1100, the student will continue applying the engineering design process and creating hand graphics while learning more complex computer programming concepts and computer-aided software as well as vector analysis. The course will be hands-on and project-based requiring two semester team projects. Two hours of lecture and two-and-one-half hours of design laboratory each week. Prerequisite: EGR 1100. Corequisite: MAT 1140. Offered: every spring semester.

EGR 2100 ENGINEERING MECHANICS (3 s.h.)

An introduction to statics and dynamics. Topics include static equilibrium of particles, rigid bodies, trusses, frames, and machines; moment of inertia; Newton’s Laws of Motion; linear and angular momentum methods; work and energy methods; kinematics of particles and rigid bodies; applications of vector analysis; and structural analysis of beams. Three hours of lecture and one-and-one-half hours of design laboratory each week. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in both EGR 1200 and MAT 2310; grade of C or better in both EGR 1200 and MAT 1140 with instructor permission. Offered: every fall semester.

EGR 2300 MATERIALS (3 s.h.)

An introduction to the structures and properties of metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. Students will gain a basic understanding of the processing and design limitations of these materials, as well as being introduced to new classes of materials being developed to meet the ever-expanding range of material requirements. Material use in product design and manufacturing is emphasized. Three hours of lecture each week. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in both EGR 2100 and CHE 1510 (does not include C- for CHE 1510). Offered: every spring semester.

EGR 3100 ENGINEERING ECONOMY (3 s.h.)

Understanding principles of evaluating alternative engineering proposals through an economic analysis. The student will learn concepts and techniques of analysis in the value of products/services, projects, and systems in relation to their cost. Topics will include costs and cost estimates, basic comparative models, break even and replacement analysis, calculating economic equivalence, purchase versus lease decisions, and financial risk evaluation. Three hours of lecture each week. Prerequisite: MAT 2310 and either ECO 2610 or ECO 2620. Offered: every spring semester.

EGR 3200 ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PRINCIPLES (3 s.h.)

Broad overview of the basic electrical engineering concepts for non-electrical engineering students. Students will be introduced to circuit analysis, transient and steady state behavior, resonant systems, system analysis, and power and energy concepts. Elementary differential equations will be introduced to solve basic transient problems. Three hours of lecture each week. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in both PHY 2520 and MAT 3090. Offered: every fall semester.

EGR 3310 ENGINEERING PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS I (3 s.h.)

Study and application of probability theory in the solution of engineering problems. Students will gain an understanding of probability concepts applicable to solve engineering problems, including reliability issues. Topics will include basics, discrete and continuous probability distributions, random variables, data analysis, parameter estimation, statistical intervals, and statistical inferences. Three hours of lecture each week. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAT 2320. Offered: every fall semester.

EGR 3320 ENGINEERING PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS II (3 s.h.)

Continuation of EGR 3310 and is the study and application of statistics in the solution of engineering problems. Students will be exposed to engineering applications of single-factor statistical analyses (e.g., confidence intervals and one-way ANOVA), multi-factor ANOVA, regression, experimental design and analysis, and other nonparametric methods. The theory and application of statistical quality control (statistical process control and statistical acceptance sampling) will also be discussed. Three hours of lecture each week. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in EGR 3310; grade of C or better in MAT 2200 with instructor permission. Offered: every spring semester.

EGR 4850 ENGINEERING SPECIAL TOPICS (3 s.h.)

Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject that may be topical or of special interest. A semester project with a written report will be required. Three hours of lecture each week. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Offered: As needed.

EGR 4900 ENGINEERING AND SOCIETY (3 s.h.)

Broad overview of current topics that should be considered as a professional engineer. Students will gain an understanding of engineering professionalism including ethics, cultural considerations, environmental considerations, and use of social media. Students will be exposed to current engineering case studies and begin to plan their senior capstone design project. Written assignments will be required throughout the course as well as a final research paper (writing-enrichment course). Three hours of lecture and one-and-one-half hours of design laboratory each week. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in EGR 3320 and all 3000-level engineering concentration courses. Offered: every fall semester.

EGR 4910 SENIOR DESIGN (3 s.h.)

Senior capstone design experience that emphasizes theory to practice. The student will work on a multidisciplinary (when possible) team to evaluate a real-world design problem for a client. The project will emphasize application of the engineering concepts from previous classes. A semester project with a written report will be required. One hour of lecture and six hours of design laboratory each week. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in all required EGR courses, all 3000-level engineering concentration courses, and a minimum of two 4000-level engineering concentration courses. Offered: every spring semester.


Industrial Engineering (INE) Courses

INE 3200 WORK ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (3 s.h.)

Introductory Industrial Engineering course. The student will gain a basic understanding of methods improvement, work measurement, and work design and apply them to various industries to increase productivity and improve worker health and safety. Written lab reports will be required throughout the course (writing-enrichment course). Three hours of lecture and one-and-one-half hours of design laboratory each week. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in both EGR 2100 and EGR 3100. Offered: every fall semester.

INE 3300 OPERATIONS RESEARCH (3 s.h.)

Broad overview of deterministic and stochastic models in operations research. The student will learn to formulate, analyze, and solve mathematical models that represent real-world problems. Topics discussed include linear programming and the simplex algorithm, transportation, network, integer, and non-linear models (deterministic models), Markov chains, and queueing models (stochastic models). Some simulation will be included. Three hours of lecture each week. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in both MAT 2320 and MAT 3120. Offered: every spring semester.

INE 3500 ERGONOMICS AND SAFETY (3 s.h.)

Study and application of ergonomic design principles in various workplace environments and product development. Emphasis will be on physiological and psychological fundamentals of safety evaluation and product development. The design of occupational safety systems and programs will also be discussed. A semester project with a written report will be required. Three hours of lecture each week. Prerequisite: Grade of C in INE 3200; instructor permission for non-INE students. Offered: every spring semester.

INE 4200 PRODUCT ENGINEERING (3 s.h.)

Broad overview of the principles involved in product design and manufacturing with a detailed examination of the engineering design process. The student will gain an understanding of product engineering from conception to market including customer specifications, systematically evaluating alternatives (e.g., TRIZ, optimization techniques), manufacturing  considerations (e.g., material selection, production requirements), and appropriate pre-market testing. Three hours of lecture each week. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in both EGR 2300 and INE 3300. Offered: every fall semester.

INE 4310 ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT (3 s.h.)

Broad overview of the principles related to project, technology, and facilities management. The student will study problems confronting the engineer manager including project monitoring, project control, time management, cost management, risk management, and facilities layout. How globalization and culture may alter engineering management decisions will also be discussed. The student will learn to use CPM, PERT, and GERT for planning, managing, and controlling projects. Three hours of lecture each week. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in INE 3300. Offered: every fall semester.

INE 4320 SYSTEMS ENGINEERING (3 s.h.)

Analyzing, designing, and improving new and existing human-made systems from an engineering standpoint. Students will gain an understanding of how all parts of the system interact and examine points of potential failure. Macroergonomics (how personnel, technology, and environmental factors influence systems and organizations) will also be included. Three hours of lecture each week. Prerequisite: Grade of C in INE 4310. Offered: every spring semester.

INE 4400 DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS (3 s.h.)

Exploration, in detail, of statistical design and analysis of experiments in engineering and science. The student will gain an understanding of developing experimental models and experimental designs using the analysis of variance. Students will learn how to plan, design, and conduct experiments efficiently and effectively. Computer software packages to implement the methods will be illustrated. A semester project with a written report will be required. Three hours of lecture and one-and-one-half hours of design laboratory each week. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in EGR 3320. Offered: As needed.

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