History Courses

History Courses

(GP) indicates that the course is a Global Perspective Elective option in the General Education core.

GEO 2520 REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY (3 s.h.)

(GP) A study of the regions of the world with emphasis on topography, climate, natural resources, urban and rural life, cultural aspects, and political life. Required of Elementary Education and Special Education: General Curriculum majors. This course is offered once a year, usually in the fall. This course does not satisfy the history requirement in the General Education Core Curriculum.

HIS 1030 WORLD HISTORY I (3 s.h.)

(GP) This course explores the human past from prehistory to 1500 A.D. with an emphasis on political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments. Students should be able to recognize and analyze historical connections between people, places, and different arenas of activity in pre-modern world civilizations. Recommended only for students who have passed ENG 1010.

HIS 1040 WORLD HISTORY II (3 s.h.)

(GP) This course explores the human past from 1500 A.D. to the present with an emphasis on political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments. Students should be able to recognize and analyze historical connections between people, places, and different arenas of activity. Recommended only for students who have passed ENG 1010.

HIS 2010 UNITED STATES HISTORY I (3 s.h.)

The transition of civilization from Europe and Africa to America, emphasizing political, social, and economic events to 1865. This course is offered every fall semester.

HIS 2020 UNITED STATES HISTORY II (3 s.h.)

The history of the United States since 1865 with emphasis on diversity in modern America and America’s rise to a world power in the twentieth century. This course is offered every spring semester.

HIS 2100 HISTORIAN’S APPRENTICESHIP (3 s.h.)

An introduction to historiography (different approaches to historical study and certain subjects within that study), varied historical sources, document analysis, and writing on a topic determined by the instructor. Required of all history majors and minors and to be taken in the sophomore year or as soon as possible. This course is offered every spring semester.

HIS 2150 BARBARIAN INVASIONS (3 s.h.)

(GP) Though the term “barbarian invasions” is usually associated with the migration of non-Romans into the Roman empire and the end of the Roman Empire in Western Europe, the course will also address the impact of historical invasions on both the invader and the invaded in terms of culture, economics, warfare, social organization and government in a number of different time periods.

HIS 2160 HISTORY OF SCIENCE (3 s.h.)

This course traces the development of the study and attempts to comprehend the natural world. It includes precursors to early science, the development of scientific method, technology and science education, the transfer of knowledge, movements in the definition and philosophy of science, the institutional context of scientific study and research, cross-cultural influences in science and technology, the rise of different scientific disciplines, cultural and political conflicts that involve the progress of scientific knowledge, and the achievements of modern science. While the central focus of the course is the development of western science and technology, Chinese, Indian and Arabic science and technology are included.

HIS 2170 RACE AND ETHNICITY IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE (3 s.h.)

(GP) Topics in the global history of racial and ethnic groups and theories of race and ethnicity.

HIS 3010 TOPICS IN MODERN ASIAN HISTORY (3 s.h.)

(GP) Survey of traditional Asian culture and development since 1600, with an alternating geographic focus at the discretion of the instructor.

HIS 3050 ISLAM AND THE ISLAMIC WORLD (3 s.h.)

(GP) Examines the beliefs and texts of Islam and explores its practices and history. This course will especially focus on the development of diversity in Islamic life and society throughout history and across geographical areas, its interactions with the western world, and its importance today.

HIS 3110 ANCIENT HISTORY (3 s.h.)

Covers Ancient Near-Eastern civilization and/or the Hellenic, Hellenistic, and Roman worlds, the expanded cultural and economic interchanges brought about by the creation of empires, such as that of Alexander the Great, the rise of Abrahamic religions, and the emergence of distinct societies in Western Europe, the Mediterranean, and Afro-Eurasia.

HIS 3120 MEDIEVAL HISTORY (3 s.h.)

This course covers European and Mediterranean societies from the Germanic migrations (ca. 450) until the beginning of the era of global exploration (ca. 1500). Topics include the formation of Western Europe, changes within Christianity and expressions of faith, Viking invasions, the development of unique Medieval political, economic and cultural practices, including feudalism, knighthood and chivalry, the flourishing power of monarchy, the Crusades, the Inquisition, the rise and transformations in medieval artistic expression, including architecture and literature.

HIS 3130 RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION EUROPE (3 s.h.)

Examines cultural, intellectual, and religious change in Europe from the Black Death (1348) to the Peace of Westphalia (1648) with a special focus on the ways developments, such as renewed interest in the ancient past, the elevation of the arts, the rise of the nation state, urbanization, expanded trade, and exploration, both influenced and impacted spiritual life.

HIS 3220 EARLY MODERN HISTORY (3 s.h.)

This course explores the emergence of modernity in Europe and the world from the 16th to 18th centuries. Emphasis will be on the accelerating pace of change, political, social, economic, intellectual revolutions, globalization, and struggles for identity in a world in flux.

HIS 3250 MODERN HISTORY (3 s.h.)

(GP) This course examines the consequences and corollaries of modernity in Europe and the world during the 19th and 20th centuries, including war, revolution, genocide, colonization and decolonization, social, political, and cultural instability, and global networks.

HIS 3310 TOPICS IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY (3 s.h.)

(GP) This course covers various topics and time periods in Central American, South American, and Caribbean history.

HIS 3550 AMERICAN SLAVERY (3 s.h.)

This course explores how and why slavery developed in the New World with special emphasis on North America. The course examines the changes in and the expansion of slavery in the United States, and it spends considerable time investigating the lives of slaves. The entire course generates questions regarding freedom, slavery, and historical change.

HIS 3600 AMERICAN CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION ERA (3 s.h.)

The course examines the causes of the Civil War, how it was fought, and how it affected American society. The course analyzes emancipation and freedom both during the war and Reconstruction.

HIS 3610 THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT (3 s.h.)

This course briefly reviews the construction of Jim Crow in America and then focuses on the challenges to Jim Crow, particularly after WWII. The course covers the Civil Rights Movement both in the South and in the rest of the nation.

HIS 3620 HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA (3 s.h.)

The history of North Carolina from the Colonial period to the present with emphasis on economic, political, and cultural developments. Prerequisite: HIS 2010 or 2020, or permission of the instructor. Every spring semester.

HIS 3700 CONTEMPORARY WORLD HISTORY (3 s.h.)

(GP) A survey of the world since 1945 emphasizing Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The major links between Europe, the United States, Africa, Asia, and Latin America will be explored. Every fall semester.

HIS 3800 TOPICS IN U.S. SOCIAL AND CULTURAL HISTORY (3 s.h.)

Topics in selected U.S. social and cultural traditions, with emphasis on the diverse ways people have made sense of the world and their place within it. Explores practices of thinking and living and the connections between them, from major specialized theories and philosophies to everyday common sense. Previous topics have included the Vietnam War, Sports in American History, and American Popular Culture.

HIS 3810 TOPICS IN EUROPEAN SOCIAL AND CULTURAL HISTORY (3 s.h.)

Topics in selected European social and cultural traditions, with emphasis on the diverse ways people have made sense of the world and their place within it. Explores practices of thinking and living and the connections between them, from major specialized theories and philosophies to everyday common sense. Previous topics have included England under the Tudors and Stuarts and Italian History.

HIS 3820 HISTORY AND GENDER (3 s.h.)

Investigates the historical meanings and practices of womanhood and manhood in diverse cultures. Topics include family relationships, sexuality, morals, politics and society.

HIS 3850 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HISTORY (3 s.h.)

Reading and research, reports, and discussion of selected topics in history. Open to History and Political Science majors and to others by permission of the department chair. Topics vary and are announced in advance of each offering. This course is offered as needed.

HIS 4110 MODERN RUSSIA (3 s.h.)

(GP) The history of Russia with particular emphasis on the Soviet and post-Soviet periods. Topics include Russian culture and religion, Russian expansion, westernization, the 1917 Revolution, the Stalinist period, the Cold War, and Russia after Communism.

HIS 4210 AMERICAN MILITARY EXPERIENCE (3 s.h.)

American military history from the Colonial Period to the present with emphasis on the interrelationship of war and society. Open to all students. Cross listed as MSL 4210. This course is offered every fall semester.

HIS 4220 TWENTIETH CENTURY AMERICAN HISTORY (3 s.h.)

In-depth study of modern America with a focus upon a variety of social, cultural, and political topics including the Cold War, Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, and recent social and economic change.

HIS 4300 HISTORY MUSEUM INTERNSHIP (3 s.h.)

Experiential learning acquired through placement with museum staff at the Museum of the Cape Fear or other regional museums. The student is assigned duties and responsibilities approved by the Director of Internships and supervised and evaluated by the University instructor and on-site supervisor. Work may include oral history projects, research and preparation for exhibits, and preparation of educational material related to museum activity. Interns work for fifteen to twenty hours per week. Weekly class contact, journal or written reports are required. Prerequisite: seniors only and permission of the department chair is required before registration.

HIS 4550 SENIOR SEMINAR: THE CRAFT OF HISTORY (3 s.h.)

Historical interpretation of major issues and research using original and secondary resources, and a major paper produced on topics determined by the interests of students and the thematic content of the course as defined by the instructor. Required for all history majors by or in their senior year. It is strongly recommended that students successfully complete History 2100 and one or more upper-level history courses before taking History 4550. This course is offered every fall semester.

HIS 4990 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN HISTORY (TBA)

An opportunity for a well-qualified, upper-division student to engage in special research in his/her major. Requires approval by the faculty advisor, the supervising professor, the department chair, and the school dean before approval by the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Credit to be determined.

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