Archive for the Historical Fiction Category

12.1.2016

The People in the Photo by Helene Gestern

I love letters. (Not <3 letters, just letters in general). I love writing them and receiving them. Email, text, DMs, are fine and convenient but not can compare to what goes into communicating through letters. Perhaps I’m romanticizing something that may seem trivial but consider the effort that is dispensed (write, fold, stamp, and mail), […]

12.1.2016

The Serpent’s Shadow by Rick Riordan

“The Serpent’s Shadow” is the last book of the Kane Chronicles trilogy and what a ride it has been. The battle against Apophis and his legions of demons and House of Life detractors has finally reached full circle and the end (preferably not the world ending) depends on if Carter and Sadie Kane can summon […]

11.22.2016

The Ugly American by William J. Lederer and Eugene Burdick

It has been interesting reading a book that was published in 1958 during the Cold War, when newly independent nation states were up for grabs between two global superpowers. From what I can surmise from the authors; it seems the stories of Americans living, working, fighting, and loving in Asia were a cautionary tale to […]

11.22.2016

The Red Notebook by Antoine Laurain

The story in its entirety is a long roundabout meet-cute. I’d like to think that the two central characters discovered themselves while searching for each other. For Laurent, the bookseller who discovered Laure’s handbag, realized it is possible to fall in love and be unapologetically happy again. (This man cannot be real: bookworm, model citizen, […]

09.15.2015

Helen of Sparta by Amalia Carosella

I love Greek mythologies! I love mythologies in general. The epic tales of heroes, monsters, magic, and trials are what Hollywood movies hope to recreate, visually. (Obviously I am on the “book” side of the book vs. movie debate) My prejudice aside, the story of Helen is not a new one. There are different versions/interpretations […]

11.28.2014

The Sultan’s Harem by Colin Falconer

I had this friend in high school who vented his problems out to me almost every week—usually Mondays. And 98% of the time the problem is his girlfriend or something involving her. After the umpteenth time of him complaining, I just had to ask him the obvious question: “Why are you still with her?” His […]

11.20.2014

Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden

The Japanese Geisha: Most westerners believe that geishas are generally prostitutes—culturally accepted prostitutes. They sing; they dance; they make you feel welcome into the country or at least in the tea house. However, Arthur Golden’s tale of Chiyo transforming into the fascinating maiden Sayuri goes in depth to describe geishas as true artists who live […]

11.20.2014

The Altarpiece by Sarah Kennedy: Book 1 of the Cross and Crown Series.

Whenever we learn of a story involving monumental changes to the status quo, we often learn about those imposing change and those resisting it. But we seldom learn about the rest who are caught in the middle of the struggle. When King Henry VIII divorced Katherine of Aragon and installed Anne Boleyn as the new […]

11.21.2011

The Borgia Betrayal by Sara Poole

In The Borgia Betrayal, Sara Poole continues with her story of the Francesca, the poisoner for the Borgias, which was begun in Poison. If I hadn’t read the first book, I don’t think that I would have bothered with this one. The novel doesn’t seem to advance the plot too much. Francesca is uncertain about […]

07.19.2011

India Black by Carol K. Carr

Do you like action movies? Do James Bond movies make your heart race? Then you might want to try India Black by Carol K. Carr. This book is full of action but is not particularly believable. The idea of a madam turned spy is kind of hard to swallow, and I had been hoping that […]

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