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What is Sexual Violence? Sexual Consent Sexual Misconduct Scenarios Common Myths Letter from Dr. William H. Walker, Dean of Students   Campus Resources Available: Reporting Resources Ms. Debra Yeatts Dr. William Walker Dr. Todd Harris Title IX Coordinator: Ms. Debra Read More …

Reporting Sexual Misconduct

Individuals who have experienced Sexual Misconduct may make a report to Methodist University’s Title IX Coordinator: Debra Yeatts, at (910) 630-7385 or dyeatts@methodist.edu. Complaints involving students will be forwarded to the Dean of Students’ office for processing.  Students may also Read More …

What Is Sexual Violence?

Sexual violence, as defined herein, is strictly prohibited by Methodist University. Sexual harassment vs. sexual violence Sexual harassment is unwanted conduct of a sexual nature.  It includes unwanted requests for sexual favors and other unwelcome sexual advances, and may be Read More …

Emergency Assistance

(Non-Confidential) If you feel unsafe and/or need emergency assistance following an incident of sexual violence, the following resources are available to help: Methodist University Security: 910-630-7577 Available 24-hours/day Security can address immediate safety concerns, facilitate contact with the Dean-on-Call and Read More …

Sexual Consent

Consent is words or actions that demonstrate a knowing or voluntary willingness to engage in mutually agreed upon sexual activity. Through its sexual misconduct prevention efforts, response resources, and Title IX sexual misconduct process, Methodist University strives to create a Read More …

Interim & Safety Measures

At any point in the reporting process, regardless of whether disciplinary action is pursued, the University may impose upon the respondent interim and safety measures to protect the complainant and the broader campus community. These interim measures include, but are Read More …

Sexual Misconduct Scenarios

Although sexual misconduct includes a wide range of behaviors, certain kinds of sexually unacceptable behaviors tend to be particularly prevalent on college campuses. Here are some examples: Scenario #1 Ann and Tom have been dating for about a year. Although Read More …

Common Myths

Despite its prevalence, sexual violence is commonly misunderstood. Too frequently, we are led to believe that sexual violence only happens to certain kinds of people in certain kinds of situations, or we are led to believe that sexual violence doesn’t happen Read More …

For Students

University students who have experienced sexual violence often confide in and seek support from fellow students before accessing professional service providers. If a fellow student turns to you for support following an incident of sexual violence, your help could be an Read More …