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LAFAYETTE COLLECTION: LETTER #11

To: Lord Palmerston
From: Lafayette
Date: May 21, 1832
In French

Paris 21 May 1832

May I please, My Lord, call on your kindness which you expressed to me when I introduced to you Charles Remusat, my Colleague at the House of Parliament and the husband of one of my grand daughters. This young couple is going on a trip to England. They will not see the uncertain scuffle, but they will witness the Popular Triumph with a friendly administration in regards to France, favorable to the European freedom and, to which its recent victory is going to, I hope, give an increase of power to show its feelings.

It was for our friends in Portugal a short exchange with Lord Aberdeen instead of you, My Lord; but today all measures are going to be immediately taken, probably to restrain the velleity, whether direct of indirect of Ferdinand VII, to renew the disheartening and the justified terrors of Don Miguel, thus to determine in favor of the Charte and for the young queen, this floating crowd, in great number everywhere in Portugal maybe more than anywhere else, who is waiting to find out to which party the power will go. This grand interest is in good hands. I have thought, My Lord, and this I must have stated previously, that your government and ours had not given to Polish cause the support that was needed and called for in the interest of the European civilization. But I am inclined to hope that today, back in power, freer and stronger than ever, that you are going to join us to energetically request that the Polish nation does not perish and that barbarous invadings be stopped. And that is how it depends on our two governments to stable the institutions to the Romagne which they have as much rights to as France and England do. May the fortunate union of our two countries contribute to the happiness of humanity, which were the wishes that your renowned compatriot, my excellent friend Charles Fox, expressed again in our last exchange of words.

Allowing myself to write this, My Lord, as a follow up on the conversation that you were kind enough to have with me, please accept the expression of my highest regards and consideration, my very best wishes and my sincere affection.

Lafayette

Image of Letter #11

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