ENG Faculty

Dr. Anicca Cox

Anicca Cox, PhD

Assistant Professor of English
(910) 630-7191
Trustees 205
Dr. Anicca Cox
Anicca Cox, PhD

Assistant Professor of English

B.A., University of New Mexico; M.A., Humboldt State University; Ph.D., Michigan State University

Academic & Research Interests:

Institutional labor, institutional ethnography, materialist feminisms, community engaged research, writing program administration, multimodal composing, graduate education, writing in the disciplines, food justice.

(910) 630-7191
Trustees 205
Dr. Cameron Dodworth

Cameron Dodworth, PhD

Professor of English; Director, Center for Research & Creativity
(910) 480-8571
Trustees 112
Dr. Cameron Dodworth
Cameron Dodworth, PhD

Professor of English; Director, Center for Research & Creativity

B.A., Nebraska Wesleyan University; M.A., University of Leicester; M.A., Ph.D., University of Nebraska at Lincoln

Bio:

Dr. Cameron Dodworth is an Associate Professor in English, specializing in nineteenth-century British literature. Dr. Dodworth’s research interests include Gothicism, nineteenth-century art and literature (particularly Realism, Impressionism, and Naturalism), adaptation studies, and food studies in literature. As an undergraduate completing his B.A. at Nebraska Wesleyan University, Dr. Dodworth majored in English, history, and French, and minored in art. He was also a four-year letterman in soccer and sang in the University Choir. Dr. Dodworth also holds a M.A. in English from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and a M.A. in Victorian Studies from the University of Leicester.  Dr. Dodworth earned his Ph.D. in English, with a certificate in Nineteenth-Century Studies from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He is currently earning an A.A. in Culinary Arts at Fayetteville Technical Community College. Dr. Dodworth loves Nebraska Cornhusker football and basketball, loves watching and playing most sports, loves cooking, loves watching movies, and loves anything to do with literature and art.

Selected Publications

“Fears of Consumption and Being Consumed: The Gothicization of Food in Victorian Literature.”  Chapter 29. The Routledge Companion to Literature and Food.  Ed.  Lorna Piatti-Farnell and Donna Lee Brien.  Abingdon, UK: Routledge, 2018.  329-341.

“The Strokes of Brush and Blade: How Basil Hallward Executed Dorian Gray in the Style of Naturalism.” Studies in Gothic Fiction 4.1 (Spring 2016).

“Haunted Tomes, Haunted Canvases: Supernatural Realism in Nineteenth-Century Novels and Paintings.” Supernatural Studies 2.2 (Summer 2015): 74-93.

“The Mystery of the Moors: Purgatory and the Absence/Presence of Evil in Wuthering Heights.”  Brontë Studies 37.2 (April 2012): 125-135.

“‘Give Us No More of Body that Shows Soul’: The Metaphysical Interior via the Physical Exterior in ‘My Last Duchess’ and ‘Fra Lippo Lippi.’”  Victorians Institute

(910) 480-8571
Trustees 112
Tyler Easterbrook

Tyler Easterbrook, PhD

Assistant Professor of English
Tyler Easterbrook
Tyler Easterbrook, PhD

Assistant Professor of English

B.A., University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Bio:

Tyler Easterbrook, PhD, is Assistant Professor of English at Methodist University. He primarily teaches writing and rhetoric courses such as Composition (ENG 1010) and Business Writing (ENG 3201). Dr. Easterbrook’s main areas of expertise are digital rhetoric, conspiracy rhetoric, and the politics of social media. He is currently working on a journal article about Pizzagate, a precursor conspiracy theory to QAnon; his future scholarship will explore other social media-based conspiracy theories and their connections to contemporary American politics. Dr. Easterbrook has received multiple awards for his research and pedagogy including a campus-wide teaching award from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he received his Ph.D. in English and Comparative Literature in 2021. More information about Dr. Easterbrook can be found at his website: tylereasterbrook.com.

Dr. Victoria Houser

Victoria Houser, PhD

Assistant Professor of English
(910) 480-8492
Trustees 269
Dr. Victoria Houser
Victoria Houser, PhD

Assistant Professor of English

M.A., Washington State University; Ph.D., Clemson University

Bio:

Victoria Houser, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of English at Methodist University. She teaches Composition and Rhetoric courses as well as Introduction to Linguistics. Dr. Houser's research interests are in composition studies, material feminisms, queer theory, and religious rhetorics. She has current scholarship in KB Journal: The Journal of the Kenneth Burke Society, Intraspection: A Journal of Rhetoric Culture and Style, and Disability Studies Quarterly as well as a forthcoming book chapter in an edited collection. In 2019, she received the Thomas E. Douglass award from Clemson University for Excellence in Teaching First-Year Composition. Houser received her Ph.D. from Clemson University in Rhetorics, Communication, and Information Design, and she earned her M.A. degree in Rhetoric and Composition from Washington State University. Dr. Houser received the Victor J. Vitanza Outstanding Dissertation Award for her dissertation titled Altared Bodies: Evangelical Purity Rhetorics in the Age of Sexual Politics.

(910) 480-8492
Trustees 269
Emily Howson

Emily Howson, MFA

Adjunct Instructor of English
Emily Howson
Emily Howson, MFA

Adjunct Instructor of English

B.A., University of Dayton; M.F.A., North Carolina State University

Bio:

I began teaching at Methodist University in 2017, which makes me the newest member of the English faculty. I teach writing, and like most teachers, I’ve got a pretty deep belief that what I teach matters. I would argue that there is considerable power in the way that we language (yes, “language” as a verb; when you’re an English instructor, few people have the courage to scold you when you break the official rules). In an increasingly online world, written words (typed ones, anyway) carry the weight of much of our interaction with one another. We have a responsibility to learn to be very careful with them.

My approach to teaching writing prioritizes clarity, structure, precision, and synthesizing information. I am interested in understanding how writing transfers across contexts and modes, in using popular cultural texts to increase student access and authority, and in developing an Accelerated Learning Program (ALP) approach to remedial writing courses at Methodist. I have this idea that composing and responding to arguments with great care is an important part of the work of citizens in a democracy.

Prior to Methodist, I taught and directed the writing center at Saint Augustine’s University. My most recent scholarly work has appeared in Dialogue: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Popular Culture and Pedagogy and Praxis: A Writing Center Journal, and my most recent creative work has appeared in The Florida Review and American Fiction.

I’m an Ohio native, with no impending plans to return. I enjoy spending time with my family (including a toddler, preschooler, spouse, dog, and cat) and reading books.

Courses Taught:

  • Skills Development in English
  • Composition
  • Composition & Introduction to Literature
  • Composition & Rhetoric
  • Reviewing Writing
Rebcecca King

Rebecca King, MFA

Director, Writing Center
(910) 630-7264
Davis Memorial Library 111
Rebcecca King
Rebecca King, MFA

Director, Writing Center

B.A., Methodist University; M.F.A., University of Southern Maine

Bio:

Rebecca King is the Director of the Writing Center at Methodist University, where she graduated, magna cum laude, in 2012 with a B.A. in Writing. She teaches the Dirty Dozen workshops and the internship course, ENG 4160, to prepare students to be writing consultants. She moved in 2007 to the Carolinas from Maine, where she owned and operated a cafe for many years, sold real estate, and started a furniture repurposing business. Rebecca values time spent with family and friends, reading, writing, traveling when possible, baking, and being in the great outdoors. She completed an MFA in creative writing at the University of Southern Maine and is currently working on her first novel. Her poetry has been published in various publications including Third Wednesday and FEM.

(910) 630-7264
Davis Memorial Library 111
Laura Lamm

Laura Lamm, MEd

Adjunct Assistant Professor of English
Laura Lamm
Laura Lamm, MEd

Adjunct Assistant Professor of English

B.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.Ed., Campbell University

Bio:

Laura Lamm, a first-generation university student and North Carolinian, is living proof that a person can teach in the public school system for over thirty years and retire in good health. She has enjoyed a long and varied career as not only a classroom teacher but also as a theatre director and forensic coach. Under her direction, students won many state awards, traveling to nationals, competitive places at colleges and universities, and scholarships. Whether on stage or paper, Laura encourages students to excel and become the best versions of themselves. She feels no better award or compliment than that her students do well in life. Laura has appeared in many commercials, films, and stage productions both locally and regionally, and while she enjoyed this work, she came to realize that she missed the classroom, so she joined Methodist University through the Writing Center (2009) where she tutored students on the paper writing process. Lately, she serves as English Coordinator on the university’s Teacher Education Committee and as a bridge between high school and freshmen English in the MAAP classes, assisting those students in strengthening their skills for future classes as only a high school veteran can, enabling them to continue their chosen studies. She is honored to be Methodist University’s Exemplary Teacher for 2019. Laura continues to expand her teaching abilities, recently adding a degree in teaching English as a Second Language to her repertoire.

She loves to travel both at home and abroad. She loves walking the beach, scavenging for driftwood and shells, and fishing. Her favorite activity is taking a ferry ride anywhere, which she hasn’t done nearly often enough.

Dr. Emily Leverett

Emily Leverett, PhD

Chair, English, Language, Literature, & Culture; Professor of English
Dr. Emily Leverett
Emily Leverett, PhD

Chair, English, Language, Literature, & Culture; Professor of English

B.A., Claremont McKenna College; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University

Bio:

I have always loved the medieval period, so it wasn’t much of a surprise that I became a professor of medieval English. As a medievalist I work with English romance—tales of knights and ladies on daring adventures filled with miracles and magic, including King Arthur and his Round Table.

Recently my scholarship has leapt forward several centuries to contemporary medievalism: I examine the ways medieval English romance appears in today’s popular entertainment. My main focus is the study of Terry Pratchett’s Discworld novels, but I have also looked at Neil Gaiman’s use of Shakespeare in the Sandman series, and the Las Vegas Golden Knights’ use of knighthood in their pre-game shows during their 2018 Stanley Cup Final.

My love of the medieval continues in my creative writing: fantasy fiction. Both my series, The Eisteddfod Chronicles and Marie de France and the Werewolf, are directly influenced by, and purposely draw from literature and other arts of the medieval period. The Eisteddfod novels center around a woman who finds herself in Fae, in a fairy London that is rife with knights, clerics, and magic. The Marie novels re-imagine the life of Marie de France if the magical romances she wrote were real. Along with novel writing, I have co-edited several speculative fiction short story anthologies.

Finally, outside of teaching and writing, I am a Carolina Hurricanes fan and the proud co-owner of three cats.

You can learn more about me and my work at https://emilylavinleverett.com/

Subjects Taught:

  • Freshman Composition
  • Survey of British Literature I
  • Shakespeare
  • Chaucer
  • Medieval Literature
  • Advanced Grammar
  • Study Abroad to Great Britain
Dr. Jennifer Rohrer-Walsh

Jennifer Rohrer-Walsh, PhD

Co-Director, Honors Program; Professor of English
(910) 630-7076
Trustees 220
Dr. Jennifer Rohrer-Walsh
Jennifer Rohrer-Walsh, PhD

Co-Director, Honors Program; Professor of English

B.A., University of Illinois; M.Ed., Indiana University; M.A., North Carolina State University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Bio:

P. Jennifer Rohrer-Walsh is a Professor of English and the Co-director of the Honors Program.  She holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Illinois, a Masters of Education from North Carolina State University, a Masters of English from Indiana University, and a Ph.D. from Greensboro University.  Her dissertation focused on rejecting the Cinderella romance in favor of what she terms “self-actualization novels” in order to empower not only females to coming of age but also flourish throughout their mature lives.  Her current scholarly interests are Buddhism as a philosophy and lifestyle, neuroplasticity, the brain-body healing connection, compassion meditation, and the Great Books.  She enjoys cooking, gardening, and taking online Coursera courses.  She has published in the areas of film and Biblical criticism, comparing contemporary texts to the Great Books.  She attends the national and international SBL conferences.  She is the faculty advisor for the Lector Club, affiliated with the Honors Program, and co-advisor for the Methodist University chapter of Alpha Lambda Delta, a national freshman honors society. She serves as the university’s faculty representative for the Rhodes Scholar Program, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Fulbright Scholars Program, and the Udall Foundation. Her professional memberships include Sigma Tau Delta, Kappa Delta Pi, and Alpha Chi.  She has held an accreditation with the NC Department of Public Instruction.  Dr. Rohrer-Walsh writes blogs about female self-actualization, hospitality, and cooking.

(910) 630-7076
Trustees 220
Dr. Kelly Walter Carney

Kelly Walter Carney, PhD

Professor of English; Co-Director, Women's Studies
(910) 630-7376
Trustees 277
Dr. Kelly Walter Carney
Kelly Walter Carney, PhD

Professor of English; Co-Director, Women's Studies

B.A., Oral Roberts University; M.A., Vanguard University; M.A., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University

Bio:

Dr. Kelly C. Walter Carney earned her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature at the Pennsylvania State University. Her fields of study include Women Writers, American Ethnic Writers, Environmental literature, and World literature. She teaches, writes, publishes, and presents at conferences in these areas; she is especially involved with SAMLA (the South Atlantic Modern Langauge Association) and ASLE (the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment). She has earned a Fulbright grant, under which she taught for a year at the Heinrich Heine University in Dusseldorf, Germany. She also has participated in several National Endowment for the Humanities seminars, including ones at the University of Texas-San Marcos (Literature of the Southwest), the Huntington Library in San Marino, California (the 19th Century West), and the Newberry Library in Chicago (Modernism). She has also participated in a summer seminar on Slave Narratives at Yale University, funded by a grant from the Council of Independent Colleges.

A native Californian, Dr. Walter Carney is an enthusiastic Dodgers fan. She volunteers with the Fayetteville Symphony Orchestra and the Girl Scouts of America, and usually has a knitting project handy.

(910) 630-7376
Trustees 277